KATHERINE NEVILLE THE EIGHT EBOOK

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The “fascinating” #1 international bestseller of a quest across centuries by two intrepid women to reunite the pieces of a powerful, ancient chess set (Los. Editorial Reviews. leccetelira.tk Review. Katherine Neville's debut novel is a postmodern site Store; ›; site eBooks; ›; Literature & Fiction. Read "The Eight" by Katherine Neville available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first eBook. The “fascinating” #1 international bestseller of.


Katherine Neville The Eight Ebook

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Compre The Eight (English Edition) de Katherine Neville na leccetelira.tk Confira também os eBooks mais vendidos, lançamentos e livros digitais. Compre The Magic Circle (English Edition) de Katherine Neville na leccetelira.tk br. Confira também os eBooks mais vendidos, lançamentos e livros digitais. Katherine's books are now available via eBook, you will find links to each of the eBooks that are Visit The Eight on Open Road Media Neville_MagicCircle.

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The pace is quick, the action almost nonstop the present-day time line is quicker-paced and much more compelling, but the past ain't all that bad. The writing, on the other hand, is almost painful in places. Clumsy attempts at foreshadowing you know the type: It's possible that Ms.

Neville took the nineteenth-century definition of "romance novel" a tad too seriously for being a twentieth-century writer. And this is certainly an unique experience in that regard; a classic nineteenth-century romance novel written, all too often, like a Harlequin circa All in all, it is a fun little book requiring great suspension of disbelief.

I'd have given it another star if part of my suspension of disbelief didn't have to be in the author's writing ability. View all 4 comments. Definition of the word "thriller" changes.

Now the word "thriller" can be deemed to include slow moving, overly convoluted stories that wander from point to point with little actual plot development or indeed plot involvment! Yes we have another story here in the vein of The Da Vinci Code.

The Eight by Katherine Neville Now Available in eBook!

I have been informed that this book was written in ' I had originally said it was "apparently inspired by said Da Vinci Code". My error. That said, it doesn't make the book any better. Taking place in both the past and the future with "countless" number based clues, cues and proofs. That's right the number Beginning back in the time of Charlemagne or They go to the big city and become nude models Anyway we are also tracking things in the "present" as "powers" seek to find said chess set.

So with all this, plots, counter plots, conspiracies going on, how can this be one of the most boring, slow moving, stultifying books I've picked up in weeks? I don't know. But it manages. Can't recommend this one. View all 16 comments. Jun 07, LauraKaarina rated it really liked it Shelves: The novel is utterly audacious in its ab use of historical characters, completely, joyfully implausible in its plotting, and I'm not certain whether the language of Romantic page-turners the author makes frequent use of "dear reader, little did I know that in two hours' time I would be running for my life trying to The two more recent books that most closely resemble The Eight are The Da Vinci Code and Kate Mosse's The Labyrinth , but I found The Eight a more enjoyable read than either of them.

The novel is utterly audacious in its ab use of historical characters, completely, joyfully implausible in its plotting, and I'm not certain whether the language of Romantic page-turners the author makes frequent use of "dear reader, little did I know that in two hours' time I would be running for my life trying to escape a KGB killer" is ironic or not.

However, I found the book hugely enjoyable as it is - I don't know anything about chess, the basic conceit of the book, but any novel in which Jean-Jacques Rousseau figures as one of the bad guys, J.

THE EIGHT KATHERINE NEVILLE EBOOK FREE DOWNLOAD

Bach as one of the good guys, and female solidarity is an important theme has a good chance of winning my heart. Pa stoga pet zvezdica. View all 3 comments. Un 8 sobre 10 para El Ocho. Jaque mate. En el juego de la vida, los peones son el alma del ajedrez.

En mi lista de favoritos! Lo he recomendado y prestado entre mis amistades. The Eight - Ex Kathleen Neville The Montglane Service, an ornate, jeweled chess set given to Charlemagne by the Moors, is said to hold a code which when deciphered will bring great power.

Nations and individuals have schemed to possess all the pieces. As the set is dispersed during the French Revolution, a young novice risks her life to safeguard it. Alternating with her story are the present-day efforts of a U. Studying the code involves musical notation, chess strategy, Fibonacci numbers, and mysticism.

I loved this book and have re-read it a couple times. Fans seem to gravitate either to the story in the past or the contemporary story.

I'm on the contemporary side. I loved the character Cat and Cat's romance, albeit a small part of the story, with the Russian, and her friend Lily with the Rolls, and the poodle.

Overall, it was a captivating adventure and a great read. View all 13 comments. Jun 02, Keith rated it it was ok Recommends it for: I think Neville chose the name "The Eight," because there are roughly eight sentences per chapter that don't contain a forced, awkward similie.

Neither pacing was appropriate, and the juxstaposition of the two was jarring. Too many characters and clumsy, pointless chess metaphors riddled the narrative. It took me months to finish this book. I'm really not sure why I kept reading it.

I suppose the much-hyped secret that would be revealed at the end kept me going; an ending that ultimately failed to satisfy, as it has been done before. Dec 29, Marijan rated it really liked it. View 2 comments. Mar 26, Mike the Paladin rated it did not like it. Now the word "thriller" can be deemed to include slow moving, overly convoluted stories that wander from point to point with little actual plot covered!

We are also tracking things in the "present" as "powers" seek to find said chess set. View all 5 comments. Sometimes you read a book and find yourself wishing it'll never end. If you want that, this is a book for you. I thought it'd never end, and I don't mean that in a good way. The book has been compared to the DaVinci Code, but I think that's an unfortunate comparison.

The story alternates between the 's and the late 's, both periods linked by the individuals quest for lost ancient knowledge. To me, the action and dangers are contrived, as is the object of the search. If you can get caught Sometimes you read a book and find yourself wishing it'll never end. If you can get caught up in pure fantasy, and not get too concerned about logic or believability, you may enjoy this book, but if you want something more believable, as I do, it's hard to stay engaged in this long book.

Aug 21, Jeannette Nikolova rated it liked it. Read on the WondrousBooks blog. Long story short: I got this book from NetGalley and I was unbelievably excited about it. In the end, it took me entirely too many weeks to finish it and now I have to send it to the "mediocre at best" shelf.

Now let me elaborate. The story of The Eight seemed very compelling: However, what we had was: The Writing Silly and childish. The characters have the tendency of becoming pale, very pale, deadly pale etc.

There's a lot of name-throwing, even though all of the big names have little actual impact on the story. Every chapter ends with something so dramatic it's utterly laughable. It sort of looks like this: Three bunnies who were friends were taking a stroll in the forest. One of the bunnies decided to pick flowers. The other two were discussing the nice weather.

A birdie was soaring the sky. A bee saw the bunnies from afar and decided to join them on the walk, only it was flying, naturally. Suddenly a dark cloud appeared. The three bunnies got worried because they didn't have an umbrella. While they were thinking about what to do and how to escape the possible storm, one of the bunnies turned and told the other two: The weather was a bit chilly. In the book there was no regard, whatsoever, about the time-frame. The events were happening in the course of so many years, but the narrative continued as if nothing has important or of any value has happened in the missing time.

I specifically mean Mireille's story. Can anyone really explain to me how these characters were so mobile in an age when the steam boat was barely a thing? Because the characters were crossing seas and oceans, traveling from America to Russia like it was the 21st century.

Nine months pregnant Mireille was traveling between Algeria and France, crossing seas and deserts, climbing steep mountains like it was a walk down the street.

Even in the "present", which was actually , the characters were almost teleporting from one destination to another. This, of course, brings us to The Characters Who were so unbelievable that even the author started joking with them at some point, in my opinion.

I mean, come on A man who supposedly rules France behind the curtains, who is a described as terrifying and evil, and then all of a sudden turns out to be a spineless plaything in the hands of Mireille and is on team Good. Or how about Cat, the first female to become a computer expert, and that, before turning 25, not to mention that alongside her unbelievable expertise, she is also fluent in a couple of languages and knows everything, from music, to computers, to physics, to mythology.

And of course, all of these characters also happen to be chosen to play the game, but how and through what criteria and how did they even get noticed? Figure that out for yourselves. And if there is something that can be considered a plausible explanation about some of the chess prodigies, there certainly isn't one about Cat, who seems to come from nowhere.

I don't even thing there was much in the way of a back-story about her. Insta-love I didn't expect it and it made me even more annoyed with the book. I'm not going to elaborate, because it's too spoiler-y, but there's insta-love, folks.

And a very lame one at that. What I did like about the story, though, was The Plot In the hands of a better writer, this book could have been amazing. The idea about the chess set is very original. The other thing which I really liked was the information of many topics, which flowed through the narrative.

The mix of fictional and real personages and histories was deeply appreciated, especially in comparison to everything else in the book. If the famous people which are randomly mentioned just to shock the reader, had any actual role in the book, it might have been much more interesting.

But as a whole, I can't ignore the fact that from informational point of view, I learned some things and I enjoyed it. The Weird Part At the end of the book, there was a detailed biography of the writer. I guess that could be considered somewhat normal, even though I don't think I've seen it done for anyone but proven authors and ones who have died a long time ago at that. But putting a gallery of headshots of the author in the book Well, that's plain strange.

Not to be rude, but what do old modeling pictures of a book's author have to do with the book itself? If I'm interested, I can Google the author. I don't really see a need for that self-promotion to be shoved down the reader's throat. Apr 20, Andy rated it did not like it.

The absolute worst. Picked it up hoping for approximately the literary equivalent of "National Treasure," instead got the literary equivalent of diarrhea.

That this is beloved by anyone anywhere, and that it ever elicited the press quotes inside the front cover, absolutely boggles my mind. There is NO dimen The absolute worst. There is NO dimension of this that meets any standard of entertainment; not even as "just a big stupid mess but who cares" is this acceptable. It is far worse and more painful than that. Solely recommended for those who do not plan to pay much attention to the story, or the characters, or god help you the words on the page - and just choose their reading based on a checklist of genre elements.

Apparently there are many such people. Even they should just get off on the back cover and move on. That all said - yes, I did read this to completion.

Because I am insane.

Do not do this. You might think you are suffering through the prose for the story, but you are not. You are suffering through both the prose and the story, and plenty more besides.

Most of all you are suffering the author herself, whose literary company I have grown to loathe and resent. May this bilious review rid me of her forever. Jednostavno, jedna od onih knjiga koje vam ne dozvoljavaju da ih ispustite iz ruku. Jul 06, Ben rated it liked it. I read this book for the first time in when I was fourteen. I just finished rereading it.

I dug up my copy when I moved to NYC 2 years ago and had been curious to pick it up again since then - partly because I had vague recollections of a couple of hot sex scenes, but largely because over a decade after I originally read it, there was a complete cultural explosion centering around another book featuring ancient secrets playing out amid high-paced modern day intrigue, namely The Da Vinci Cod I read this book for the first time in when I was fourteen.

I dug up my copy when I moved to NYC 2 years ago and had been curious to pick it up again since then - partly because I had vague recollections of a couple of hot sex scenes, but largely because over a decade after I originally read it, there was a complete cultural explosion centering around another book featuring ancient secrets playing out amid high-paced modern day intrigue, namely The Da Vinci Code.

Since I myself basically hated The Da Vinci Code and resented all the attention it got, I found myself wondering if The Eight hadn't deserved some of that attention.

Well, it did. The books are actually quite similar in a number of important ways.

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Not only are they both about modern-day murder mysteries leading to quests for ancient relics of great power, but they both involve a good deal of decoding of multi-layered messages and creating of mythic narratives connecting different eras by playing a little fast and loose with history. This review is really a side-by-side comparison of the two books.

I consider this a virtue of The Eight by comparison, since at the end of The Da Vinci Code I basically just felt like my curiosity had been taken advantage of. However, it's also a function of the fact that The Eight regularly goes into a bit too much detail. This is the one meritocratic reason I can think of why The Eight never got the attention of its successor.

Other than that, every weakness of The Eight - hackneyed exposition, a romantic subplot not really justified by the main story, a tendency to overhype its revelations, an inevitably unsatisfying denouement after all the intricate build-up, and a lingering impression that the author is engaging in a bit of wish-fulfillment - is an equal if not deeper weakness in The Da Vinci Code. Meanwhile, The Eight has a good deal to recommend it: First of all, it's quite intellectually ambitious, much more so than TDVC.

In fact it's a veritable nerdfest. The action takes place both in the late 18th century and the s, in locations ranging from the USA to France, England, Algeria, and Russia. The narrative manages to tie together not only a number of players in the French Revolution - Talleyrand, Robespierre, Marat, and a young Napoleon - but a vast number of other 18th century notables, political and intellectual: The history of which the narrative makes referential use has a much wider scope still.

But it doesn't stop with history: Meanwhile somehow everything gets connected to the game of chess, metaphorically or literally. Actually, from a literary point of view, much of this, especially the math and the science, is actually kind of troublesome - c. Secondly, The Eight's 2 female leads one in the 18th century and one in the 70s both completely drive the plot, exercizing substantial smarts, resourcefulness and determination in addition to considerable hotness.

This is and this shouldn't really be anything to get excited about. However, since in The Da Vinci Code, which purports to be a sort of feminist book since it's supposedly all about uncovering the Church's repression of the divine feminine, there is only one important female character Sophie Neveau and she, although ostensibly a cryptographer, doesn't do or figure out almost anything important in the course of the plot, I found myself reading The Eight with a feeling that it was sort of an antidote to TDVC's fake feminism.

Overall, I don't think I can really claim The Eight is a "good book". I certainly didn't find it satisfying. And see the list of its sins shared with TDVC in paragraph 4 above. But now that The Da Vinci Code has legitimated the genre of hamhanded ancient-secret codebreaker thrillers, I find myself wanting to fight for The Eight's place at this table.

There are some warnings I feel I should give about this book before recommending it to people: It's about a magic chess set.I love a story set in two time eras and Katherine Neville does an excellent job interweaving the elements of the story and creating suspense in both. History and mythology rule the day while adventure had me on the edge of my seat. Valentine and Mireielle are novices are Montglane Abbey. A few chapters in I felt as If I'd already been buried in references to people, groups, geographic features, relics, symbols and and and that had ever had a shred of mystery attached to them.

Blending exquisite prose and captivating history with nonstop suspense, Neville again weaves an unforgettable story of peril, action, and intrigue. Dianne Emley.